The L-CAS (Laser Collision Avoidance System) is a laser guided system that gives aerial ladder operators a heads up display of a precise distance from the edge of the ladder to the edge of a building.

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Lasers give an accurate heads ups display letting operators know how far ladders are from building, eliminating need for spotters

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Optional Armor available to protect units on end or ariel ladders.

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The L-CAS is installed easily to the tip of any aerial ladder and can be installed with an optional armor package for added protection.

Highlights
  • heads up display so that operator never needs to look away from tip of aerial
  • accurate within 4 inches at all heights and aerial movements
  • tested by operators who found they were comfortable with device after a few minutes of practice
  • saves man power by eliminating the need for spotters
Technical Specs

HxWxD:     2″ x 5.5″ x 4″   –   50 mm x 140 mm x 100 mm

Weight:     2 lbs   –   1 kg

With Armour:     6 lbs – 2.7 kg

Power Requirements:     12V DC   –   20w    –   1.6 amps

Command Light, in collaboration with Real Fire Tools, has developed a Laser Collision Avoidance System (L-CAS) that creates a heads-up display when approaching a structure with an aerial ladder. No more relying on spotters, whose time could be spent better with other operations.

The L-CAS uses three laser beams that appear on the building. As an aerial ladder approaches the building, the beams of light move closer together giving operators a precise indication of the distance from the building. When using the L-CAS in tests, operators were accurate within 4 inches, even when ladders are extended to distances of 80 and 100 feet.

The intuitive system is as effective with all three aerial movement axes. Whether you are extending the ladder, rotating it, booming it in, or a combination of all three, the L-CAS will give you the confidence of knowing exactly how far from the building you are.

The L-CAS also increases accuracy when laddering a roof. The operator is able to see exactly when the tip of the ladder has crossed the edge of the roof, as the beams of light will disappear. No more expectations of a six foot aerial overshoot, only to find it overhanging two feet making the transition of the roof much more risky.